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The classic poem for this issue of The Fairfield Review features a piece written by one of the most enigmatic poets, Emily Dickinson. A native of New England, she endured many a dark winter, and this poem explores both the despair of its real darkness and the anguish of mental darkness. In the end, however, she has a vision of the light through those dark days, as hopeful as dawn follows night. --jsg

419
by Emily Dickinson

We grow accustomed to the Dark --
When Light is put away --
As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp
To witness her Goodbye --

A Moment -- We uncertain step
For newness of the night --
Then -- fit our Vision to the Dark --
And meet the Road -- erect--

And so of larger -- Darkness --
Those Evenings of the Brain --
When not a Moon disclose a sign --
Or Star -- come out -- within --

The Bravest -- grope a little --
And sometimes hit a Tree
Directly in the Forehead --
But as they learn to see --

Either the Darkness alters --
Or something in the sight
Adjusts itself to Midnight --
And Life steps almost straight.





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Document last modified on: 02/12/1998

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